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*  CONTENTS
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*  EDITORIAL
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*  MAJOR ARTICLES
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*  JOKES
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*  LESSON OUTLINES
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*  AN OLD EXERCISE
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*  COURSE OUTLINE
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*  READERS LETTERS
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*  PREVIOUS EDITIONS
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*  BOOK PREVIEW
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*  POEMS
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Pilgrims 2005 Teacher Training Courses - Read More
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Humanising Language Teaching
Humanising Language Teaching
Humanising Language Teaching
READERS' LETTERS

Letter 1

Dear
Please send to me about grammar examples in english
Best Regarts
sefa sayan

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Letter 2

Many thanks for publishing the letter Hania and congratulations on a jam-packed issue!

Best

Philip Prowse

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Letter 3

Hi Hania,

() There are lots of really interesting things in the current HLT! Many congratulations. I'm particularly interested in the stuff on chat and on powerpoint.

() All good wishes

Felicity

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Letter 4 and 5

Dear Sir, My name is Jebril, and I am a Palestinian English language teacher who teaches in Hisham Secondary school in Jericho (occupied territories in the west bank in Palestine) I teach students whose age is between 16-18years old. Every year I teach around 200 students (26 English language periods per week) I got my B.A from Al Quds Open University (open learning). I couldn't Attend regular university because I have to work to help my poor family. I face many troubles in my job (teaching the English language), especially in communicating with my Arab students and attacking them to learn the English language which they find very difficult.

Due to this I start to develop myself to face my responsibilities toward my students and to satisfy my conscience. But our situation is really miserable due to the occupation, our financial problems, and that we don't have such educational organizations that can help us in this field (developing my English language and to keep myself updated with it).

So I start to seek the help from educational organizations or English Language native speakers who can help (which is stemmed out from their experience and instincts to help the others) me in this field.

I don't know how the destiny through your respectful organization in my way. But I hope that you understand my situation and evaluate it well. Please help me in order to graduate a generation of students who can carry the message, the message of life.

With all my respect,
Jebril.

Note 1: please feel free to ask about anything .don't hesitate to give me any suggestions, ideas, plans, name of organizations, and persons that can help me.

Note 2: I will be happy if you have any books, references, editorials, periodicals; CDS that you can me send a hard copy to my following mail address:

Jebril Al-Qaderi, Hisham Ben Abd Almalik secondary school, Jerusalem Street, Jericho, West bank, Israel.

Dear Sirs,

Teaching is not only to get a degree and then to start teaching in any school or any educational firm. And of course, the teacher should be well qualified and should have positive inclines toward his job in order to do it perfectly (perfect ness is only to god).I think that teaching languages (the English language in my case) is one of the most difficult kind of teaching, because we don't teach the language itself only (I mean writing, reading, listening, and speaking) but we teach a whole culture, civilization, and tradition of the Language native speakers.

Jebril Al-Qaderi, Hisham Ben Abd Almalik secondary school, Jerusalem Street, Jericho, West bank, Israel.

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Letter 6

Dear ***,

() A story about dancing grammar came into my head.

I am not sure what it might mean but it seems to me to relate in some way to this topic of grammar and our various attitudes to it.

I was in Freetown in a small bar. We were dancing to, 'No Woman No Cry'. About four people. It was hot and humid. All I heard was the plaintive music and the sound of bare feet shuffling on tiles. The man opposite to me, a small man, wore a brown suit but nothing else. No shirt or shoes. He danced so richly but so quietly. At last I said to him. 'You dance wonderfully. I wish I could dance like that.'

He stopped dancing and came and stood next to me. He said without a smile, 'I will teach you. Stand like me with both feet together'.

I stood next to him with both feet together. 'Now move your left foot forwards.' He did and I copied him. 'Now move your right foot forwards.' He did and I copied him. 'Now move your left foot back.' He did and I copied him. 'Now your right foot.' He did and I copied him. 'That's it!' he said and began his sinuous dancing, contrapuntal surges flowing in each limb.
'But thats not it! That's not what you are doing!' I gasped with a grin and a protest.
Another man with a long peaked baseball hat shadowing his face said, 'Listen to the music. Welcome it. Invite it into your body and it will dance you.'

()

Andrew Wright

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